Agustín Mista

Syntax test

Posted on June 3, 2018

This post is mostly intended to test the Markdown syntax supported by Pandoc with the page Css.

Plain Text

Aliquam erat volutpat. Nunc eleifend leo vitae magna. In id erat non orci commodo lobortis. Proin neque massa, cursus ut, gravida ut, lobortis eget, lacus. Sed diam. Praesent fermentum tempor tellus. Nullam tempus. Mauris ac felis vel velit tristique imperdiet. Donec at pede. Etiam vel neque nec dui dignissim bibendum. Vivamus id enim. Phasellus neque orci, porta a, aliquet quis, semper a, massa. Phasellus purus. Pellentesque tristique imperdiet tortor. Nam euismod tellus id erat.


  • Here is a link.
  • Here is the same link with alt text.

Images

Images are inserted using the following syntax. Captions are optional.

This is a caption.
This is a caption.

Math

Nf, the flux associated with the ith filter is Fi, and the weight, wi, is defined as


wi ≡ σF, i − 2,

where σF, i is the uncertainty in the flux associated with the ith filter. Assume that all sums range from i = 1 to i = Nf and use the summation convention on repeated indices. Note that we strike things out like this, italicize things like this or like this, and we can make things bold like this or like this.

Unfortunately, –> and => do not turn into arrows automatically, but you can make arrows like this and . You can also implement a Pandoc filter to add features that are not built-in. So, it would be possible to make –> turn into and introduce new features, such as Graphviz graph rendering. For examples of such filters, check out this list (or keep reading this document).

Here’s a horizontal line / separator:


Table Creation

There are many ways of creating tables. This is an example of the pipe table creation syntax…

Label Description
meanflx F⟩ = Fi
wmeanflx Fw = ω

Here’s one more example, with a table caption:

Demonstration of simple table syntax.
Right Left Center
12 12 12
123 123 123
1 1 1

Refer to the documentation to learn more about the other types of tables.


Line Blocks

Normally, adjacent lines are combined together, so a set of short formatted lines, such as an address or verse, becomes jumbled. To overcome this, place | at the beginning of each line, followed by a space. This preserves the formatting:

I am the very model of a modern Major-General,
I’ve information vegetable, animal, and mineral,
I know the kings of England, and I quote the fights historical
From Marathon to Waterloo, in order categorical
I’m very well acquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
I understand equations, both the simple and quadratical,
About binomial theorem I’m teeming with a lot o’ news,
With many cheerful facts about the square of the hypotenuse.

I’m very good at integral and differential calculus;
I know the scientific names of beings animalculous:
    In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
    I am the very model of a modern Major-General.

Note the indentation on the final two lines above.


Block Quotes

The syntax for block quotes is extremely simple:

You can write a block quote by putting a single ‘>’ at the beginning of a block of text or by placing the ‘>’ at the beginning of each line of the quoted block, similar to the way e-mail readers handle quoted messages.


Enumerated lists

  1. You can use integers or the # symbol in enumerated lists.
  2. This is quite convenient. For example, i. You don’t have to count
    1. If you want to change the order, no numbering needs to be changed
  3. You can also use roman numerals, obviously.

Example Lists

  1. This is Example (1).

  2. This is Example (2).

Now we discuss something for a while and introduce the third example…

  1. This is Example (3).

You can refer to an example by its label. For instance Example (2).


Syntax Highlighting

A Python syntax highlighting example:

You can include blocks of pre-formatted text, like this. If the text is source code, you can tell Pandoc to perform syntax highlighting. This is graphviz.py:

A C++ syntax highlighting example:

Here’s another example using a different programming language (and a different method of specifying the pre-formatted text block).


Compiling this with Pandoc

To convert1 this Markdown document to HTML, I used the following command:

An explanation of each parameter (as a bulleted list)

  • example.md: the input file
  • -s: create a stand-alone document (rather than a document fragment that lacks a header).
  • --smart: automatically replace --, ---, and ... with –, —, and … and handle quotation marks properly.
  • --mathjax: use the MathJax library for typesetting math in HTML documents.
  • --css nrstyle.css: Use the nrstyle.css stylesheet in the HTML output document.
  • --highlight-style pygments: Turn on syntax highlighting and use the pygments color scheme.
  • --columns=200: set the line length to 200. This makes the tables display properly.
  • --filter graphviz.py: Pass Pandoc’s abstract syntax tree through the filter program graphviz.py before rendering the output document.
  • -o example.html: Specify the name and type of the output file. The format is inferred from the suffix (file extension).

The same explanation, formatted as a definition list

example.md

The input file

-s

Create a stand-alone document (rather than a document fragment that lacks a header).

--smart

Automatically replace --, ---, and ... with –, —, and … and handle quotation marks properly.

--mathjax

Use the MathJax library for typesetting math in HTML documents.

--css nrstyle.css

Use the nrstyle.css stylesheet in the HTML output document.

--highlight-style pygments

Turn on syntax highlighting and use the pygments color scheme.

--columns=200

set the line length to 200. This makes the tables display properly.

--filter graphviz.py

Pass Pandoc’s abstract syntax tree through the filter program graphviz.py before rendering the output document.

-o example.html

Specify the name and type of the output file. The format is inferred from the suffix (file extension).


  1. This is a footnote.