INTERACTION DESIGN METHODOLOGY [idm] 2010
IDC |:| interaction design



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PROJECT


Project brief HERE


DELIVERABLE: WRITTEN REPORT

+ 4 pages (corresponding to 3 pages of text and 1 page of images) including references
+ In English
+ Focus on the design process, design intent, methodology and reasoning!


THE REPORT SHOULD CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS:

+ Framing of the problem
+ Background/current situation
+ Alternative designs
+ Evaluation of alternatives
+ Prototype
+ Reflections


WE WOULD LIKE YOU TO SHOW THAT YOU ARE ABLE TO:

+ Frame the problem and objective
+ Create and envision alternative design strategies and solutions, taking all the relevant constraints into consideration
+ Analyse and evaluate these alternatives, and then select and argue for the the best solution
+ Visualize/prototype the selected alternative in a way suitable to the solution you want to propose.
+ Use a clear vocabulary regarding the design process
+ Plan use of methods dependent on the specific context
+ Show that you have a toolbox of potential methods
+ Discuss possible methods (and why not to use them)



A FEW ADVICES:

* Think quality instead of quantity in the report, meaning deeper reflections are better than re-telling descriptions of methods.

* The more you reflect upon your process, methods, result, and so on, the more prepared you are for the home exam.

* Where to start? Letís start by saying that the worst way to start out any explorative project is to look for a solution first, and then spend all the time refining it. Instead, you must start with framing a problem. You have to challenge your first ideas in order to develop a new perspective. This is difficult, but it is only through the careful framing of non-trivial problems that you can even hope for non-trivial design solutions. And this is also why I did not provide a definitive project problem statement - crafting the question is as important to the end result as answering it.
Ok, so how do I look for 'proper problems' then? Well, one way to do it is to consider what kind of project you would like to do. Design methods rarely appear verbalised on their own but rather as embedded into various practices Ė so you have to look into how people and projects you find inspiring approached their issues, and try to translate their methodology into your context.
For instance, are you going to use a participatory approach? Then you need to establish contact with the user groups you want to work with - and how. Are you going to base your work on real scenarios, incidents and accidents, then perhaps you should spend some time in the context collecting stories about what is going on. Further, you do not have to make something in support of the user or client: you can take a critical and perhaps interventionist approach, and see what possible alternative or provocative solutions there are.

* Use sketches!!


REFLECTION

Remember that the grading (pass / no pass) of your project to a large part is focused on reflections of your design work. Reflect on how and why you have worked the way you have, and try to come to conclusions about your work. How is your design connected to the way you have worked? Do not focus on re-telling, but try to analyse your methodical work.


HOW TO NOT CHEAT OR PLAGIARIZE


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